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The Resource Wrecked, E.R. Frank

Wrecked, E.R. Frank

Label
Wrecked
Title
Wrecked
Statement of responsibility
E.R. Frank
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
After a car accident seriously injures her best friend and kills her brother's girlfriend, sixteen-year-old Anna tries to cope with her guilt and grief, while learning some truths about her family and herself
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 2006
Review
  • Gr. 9-12. Returning to the mature voices and situations of Life Is Funny (2000) and America (2002), Frank's fourth novel dissects the suffering of teenage Anna, after she survives a drunk-driving accident that leaves her brother's girlfriend dead. Despite a premise that seems plucked from a problem novel, Frank departs from cliches in her portrayal of Anna as an essentially responsible kid (the other driver was drunk) and in her focus on how tragedy can magnify preexisting conflicts. Other elements receive less-nuanced treatment: Anna's emotionally abusive father's explosions of irrational fury seem caricatured, and subplots dealing with homophobia and alcoholism seem insufficiently developed. Frank may also lose readers in the rambling passages stemming from Anna's guided-visualization therapy. Even so, it's fascinating to observe how a proven author can transform a basically sensational plot, even in limited ways. YAs won't soon forget Anna's moving articulations of «panic spreading through [her] blood, like ink in water,» or her inability to banish flashbacks to the late-night drive that ended, horrifically, with «screaming, stopped.» -- Jennifer Mattson (Reviewed 12-01-2005) (Booklist, vol 102, number 7, p35)
  • Gr 8 Up –Anna is driving a very drunk friend home from a party. Moments into the journey, a head-on collision leaves Ellen with a punctured lung and other serious injuries, Anna with a lacerated eye, and the other driver dead. The dead teen happens to be her brother's girlfriend. Anna clearly remembers Cameron's final screams, and she suffers nightmares. Her father is an emotionally repressed tyrant who at first won't allow his daughter to receive counseling. Frank develops and sustains credible characters whose problems are realistic and interconnected. Brief flashbacks allow readers to become acquainted with Jack as he was before Cameron's death and even as he was when he and Anna were children. Their father's brittle personality is not evil or even cruel, but clearly riddled with flaws bred of deeply held fears. In spite of some plot twists that seem convenient rather than realistic, such as the teens' pre-Thanksgiving trip to Florida with Ellen's parents, this story is compulsively readable both because Anna is likable and imperfect and because Frank's writing is so fluid. Rather than being a didactic anti-drinking or pro-counseling story, this is a psychological drama that is definitely worth teens' time.–Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA --Francisca Goldsmith (Reviewed November 1, 2005) (School Library Journal, vol 5, issue 11, p132)
  • Frank's (Life Is Funny ) newest book deals with a family torn apart when 16-year old narrator Anna kills her brother's girlfriend, whose car swerves into Anna's lane as she drives home from a party. "The day I killed my brother's girlfriend started with me handpicking leaves off our front lawn," the novel begins, alternating between the present and flashbacks. At its best, the structure allows for moments of clarity as Anna makes sense of her family's tensions, such as a scene involving her cleaning her parents' glass collection and her controlling father asking, "Remember when Jack broke the bud vase?" Anna takes the opportunity to admit that she had broken that vase six years before, marking a sea change within her. At times, however, these juxtapositions of past and present are not as fluidly integrated, serving to distance readers from the characters. As the novel goes on, the pace picks up. Frank offers a nakedly honest portrayal of the ups and downs that plague Anna day in and day out as she attempts to deal with the aftermath of her trauma. She experiences guilt and a fear of love, and eventually gains the knowledge that whatever life throws one's way, "mostly you realize you can handle it." With her powerful staccato writing style and her aversion to fairytale flourishes, Frank creates credible, all too human characters figuring out life as they go. Ages 12-up. (Oct.) --Staff (Reviewed November 14, 2005) (Publishers Weekly, vol 252, issue 45, p70)
  • A teen copes with post-traumatic stress disorder after the car she is driving home after a party collides with one driven by her brother's girlfriend, killing her. Sixteen-year-old Anna has not had it particularly easy before now: Her tyrannical father is given to capricious orders and towering rages, and her mother is caring but distant. Before the accident, however, she had been drawing closer to her brother Jack after a period of adolescence-induced hostility, a détente significantly threatened by the event. Frank once again offers a compelling tale of psychological renewal, weaving Anna's post-accident present-tense narration through with her memories of significant moments in her family's past. An innovative therapy (a process called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) proves successful for Anna, and by story's end, she and her family are on the way to healing, albeit some more smoothly than others. Lacking either the searing intensity of America (2002) or the psychological subtlety of Friction (2003), this offering smacks rather more of problem-novel than purely literary effort. Anna's voice and situation are both entirely genuine—and scarily relevant—however, and both make this a highly worthwhile read. (Fiction. 12+) (Kirkus Reviews, September 1, 2005)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
139734
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Frank, E. R
Index
no index present
Intended audience
680
Intended audience source
Lexile
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 8
  • 12
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Traffic accidents
  • Death
  • Grief
  • Guilt
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Self acceptance
  • Family problems
Target audience
adolescent
Label
Wrecked, E.R. Frank
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"A Richard Jackson book."
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
247 p.
Isbn
9780689873836
Lccn
2004018448
System control number
  • (Sirsi) SITE1-32450
  • (OCoLC)56413406
Label
Wrecked, E.R. Frank
Publication
Note
"A Richard Jackson book."
Dimensions
22 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
247 p.
Isbn
9780689873836
Lccn
2004018448
System control number
  • (Sirsi) SITE1-32450
  • (OCoLC)56413406

Library Locations

    • A. Mitchell Powell Jr. BranchBorrow it
      25 Hospital Road, Newnan, GA, 30263, US
      33.387732 -84.816797

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