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The Resource The wicked and the just, by Jillian Anderson Coats

The wicked and the just, by Jillian Anderson Coats

Label
The wicked and the just
Title
The wicked and the just
Statement of responsibility
by Jillian Anderson Coats
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In medieval Wales, follows Cecily whose family is lured by cheap land and the duty of all Englishman to help keep down the "vicious" Welshmen, and Gwenhwyfar, a Welsh girl who must wait hand and foot on her new English mistress
Writing style
Character
Award
  • School Library Journal Best Books, 2012.
  • YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults, 2013.
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Gr 6 – 9 — Set in 13th-century North Wales 10 years after the English takeover, this is an instantly gripping story of injustice spawned by subjugation. Cecily, an English girl, tells readers from the outset that her life has been ruined now that she has been uprooted to live among "savages," as she calls the Welsh. Gwenhwyfar is a servant to Cecily, who assumes that she is to be the lady of the house and demands to be treated accordingly. Gwinny resents Cecily, referring to her throughout her narrative as "the Brat." Fleshed-out, multidimensional characters breathe life into this little-known period. Coats's cinematic prose immerses readers in medieval life as she vividly depicts the animosity between the Welsh and the English. Though both young teens are strong and opinionated, they feel victimized, and their determination and will to survive are clearly voiced. While Cecily is cruel to Gwinny at times, she also expresses occasional compassion for her and intercedes anonymously to help her and her family. Even in her haughtiness, Cecily disdains her father's fawning to impress those in power and is disapproving when he reduces promised wages to Welshmen by half. Gwinny also shows some compassion for Cecily when she saves her from a potentially bad match with a scoundrel. This debut novel reverberates with detail, drama, and compassion. The appended historical note is helpful; it's unfortunate that there is no glossary of unusual terms. Fans of Karen Cushman's The Midwife's Apprentice (1995) and Catherine, Called Birdy (1994, both Clarion) will surely be drawn to this unique story.—Renee Steinberg, formerly at Fieldstone Middle School, Montvale, NJ --Renee Steinberg (Reviewed May 1, 2012) (School Library Journal, vol 58, issue 05, p96)
  • Cecily is furious when her father uproots her to begin a new life in Caernarvon (occupied Wales), where he will be a burgess, keeping order on behalf of the English king. The year is 1293, and tensions between the English and the Welsh are high. When Cecily arrives in Caernarvon, she behaves haughtily, attempting to act as the lady of the house in place of her late mother. Welsh housemaid “Gwinny” hates her immediately, and the girls’ battles and mutual resentment mirror the larger problems between their respective countries. Coats’s debut shifts gracefully between the two girls’ perspectives, finding empathy for both—no small feat when it comes to Cecily, who is naÃóve and sometimes downright cruel. She begins to recognize the injustices around her (including several of her own doing), while Gwinny struggles to keep her gravely ill mother and younger brother alive. Addressing the difference between vengeance and justice, the novel is steeped in the details and dialect of the Middle Ages, depicting barbaric events and dramatic inequalities. Ages 12–up. Agent: Ammi-Joan Paquette, Erin Murphy Literary Agency. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed February 27, 2012) (Publishers Weekly, vol 259, issue 09, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Two girls of very different degree are brought together unwillingly by the English conquest of Wales. Cecily is in a pet at having to leave the home of her youth--where her mother is buried--and relocate to the Welsh frontier, but her father is a younger son. He will take a burgage in Caernarvon, recently conquered by Edward I. In exchange for a home, he will help to keep the King's peace. Cecily hates Caernarvon. She hates its weather, its primitive appointments and its natives, especially Gwinny, the servant girl who doesn't obey, and the young man who stares at her. It would be easy to dismiss this book as a Karen Cushman knockoff; Cecily's voice certainly has a pertness that recalls Catherine, Called Birdy. But there's more of an edge, conveyed both in the appalling ease with which Cecily dismisses the Welsh as subhuman and in Gwinny's fierce parallel narrative. "I could kill the brat a hundred different ways." Never opting for the easy characterization, debut author Coats compellingly re-creates this occupation from both sides. It all leads to an ending so brutal and unexpected it will take readers' breath away even as it makes them think hard about the title. Brilliant: a vision of history before the victors wrote it. (historical note) (Historical fiction. 12 & up)(Kirkus Reviews, March 15, 2012)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10107216
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Coats, Jillian Anderson
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
780
Intended audience source
Lexile
LC call number
PZ7.C62927
LC item number
Wi 2012
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 6
  • 9
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Wales
  • Wales
  • Middle Ages
  • Prejudices
  • Household employees
Target audience
pre adolescent
Label
The wicked and the just, by Jillian Anderson Coats
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
344 p.
Isbn
9780547688374
Lccn
2011027315
System control number
(OCoLC)744294377
Label
The wicked and the just, by Jillian Anderson Coats
Publication
Dimensions
22 cm.
Extent
344 p.
Isbn
9780547688374
Lccn
2011027315
System control number
(OCoLC)744294377

Library Locations

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