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The Resource The manny, Holly Peterson

The manny, Holly Peterson

Label
The manny
Title
The manny
Statement of responsibility
Holly Peterson
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Jamie Whitfield's son, Dylan, is having trouble at school and could really use a strong male role model at home. Since Jamie's husband, Phillip, whose alternating sweet and insufferable mood swings are about to drive Jamie mad, is spending even more time at work and even less at home, it seems like he is not going to be taking on that duty. So Jamie hires the extremely capable Peter Bailey to spend time with Dylan, and Peter quickly has Dylan's life back in order. But Jamie never expected her cute new ""manny"" would shake up her own life quite so much in the process. Peterson's experiences as a television producer give her debut novel its realistic edge, and the over-the-top lifestyles of Manhattan's rich and powerful provide the extravagant setting for this delightfully acerbic tale of one woman's struggles to balance the demands of work and home. -- Charles, John (Reviewed 05-15-2007) (Booklist, vol 103, number 18, p21)
  • Jamie Whitfield, 36, lives on Park Avenue with her three children and her mostly absent high-powered attorney husband, Phillip, and works part-time as a producer for a prime-time news program. She hires Peter Bailey—29 and biding his time until he get funding for his software business—to plug the household's gaps and be a father figure to nine-year-old Dylan. The two, of course, are attracted to each other, and when Peter's money comes through, he doesn't tell Jamie. Phillip's temper tantrums when lacking pulpless orange juice or a wooden-handled umbrella are surprisingly funny, and a subplot where Jamie chases a trashy but potentially career-making story is strong. Jamie's co-workers are more realistically portrayed than her shallow friends, but even Jamie's children come alive when they root for mom's success. (June) --Staff (Reviewed March 26, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 13, p64)
  • Jamie Whitfield has it all—she's just having a bit of trouble juggling it at the moment. She's got a high-pressure job, an oft-absent spouse, and a son who's falling apart emotionally. Enter Peter Bailey, the male nanny—or "manny"—a smart, thirtysomething entrepreneur whose positive influence on nine-year-old Dylan as a stand-in guy-around-the-house unexpectedly extends to Jamie, too. In contrast to Jamie's alpha-male husband, who doesn't just want to keep up with the Joneses but to surpass them at any cost, Peter's a laid-back, go-with-the-flow kind of guy, seemingly the perfect tonic for an overstressed Jamie. Every Park Avenue mom knows that the man on the household staff is never the knight in shining armor—except maybe this one. In Peterson's fast-paced debut novel, no topic is taboo, from the working world to preschoolers' birthday parties, from high fashion to sex. The dialog is quick and witty, though the characters are more stock than not. Recommended for larger public libraries and libraries where mom lit is very popular. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/07.]—Amy Brozio-Andrews, Albany P.L., NY --Amy Brozio-Andrews (Reviewed May 1, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 8, p74)
  • Busy Manhattan mom in a shaky marriage to a self-absorbed lawyer hires a strapping young hipster to spend quality time with her neglected son, in Emmy-winning, former ABC News producer Peterson's debut.With a fulfilling TV producer job, three healthy kids and a fabulous Upper East Side apartment, Jamie Whitfield is grateful for the hand she has been dealt, in spite of her less-than-perfect relationship with her difficult husband Phillip. A spoiled preppy prone to ridiculous temper tantrums, Phillip is also a workaholic who spends very little time with his family. This has taken a toll on nine-year-old Dylan, who has become sad, distant and unable to deal with disappointment. Thinking that her boy would benefit from a stabilizing male force, Jamie interviews a series of college-aged potential mannies without luck. Her prayers are answered when she sees Peter Bailey working with a group of special needs youngsters in the park. He might only be substituting for a friend, but he is a natural with kids. The 29-year-old Colorado native is no dumb bunny either: He's an Internet entrepreneur waiting on funding for a big project. Peter agrees to take Jamie's well-paying and flexible gig at least until his money comes through. Once in her house, Peter proves to be outgoing and warm. He has a positive effect on the kids, with Dylan overcoming his issues under Peter's big-brotherly wing. Peter also has an unexpected (to Jamie, if not the reader) effect on Mom, helping her see the hypocrisy of the hoity-toity world in which she lives, and getting her to stick up for herself at home and at work. Things with Phillip, meanwhile, continue to erode, and Jamie begins to realize she might have feelings for "the help." Peterson offers an amusing take on the mating habits of the Manhattan elite. And while the story holds few surprises, it benefits greatly from an attractive pair of would-be lovers. (Kirkus Reviews, April 15, 2007)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
162983
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Peterson, Holly
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Nannies
  • Male child care workers
  • Rich people
  • Manhattan (New York, N.Y.)
Label
The manny, Holly Peterson
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
353 p.
Isbn
9780385340403
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2006102945
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o77504714
  • (OCoLC)77504714
Label
The manny, Holly Peterson
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
353 p.
Isbn
9780385340403
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2006102945
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o77504714
  • (OCoLC)77504714

Library Locations

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      33.387732 -84.816797

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