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The Resource The Whitechapel conspiracy, Anne Perry

The Whitechapel conspiracy, Anne Perry

Label
The Whitechapel conspiracy
Title
The Whitechapel conspiracy
Statement of responsibility
Anne Perry
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Perry has a knack for presenting Victorian society--from ballrooms replete with every luxury to London slums filled with suffering and disease--with engaging realism and biting social commentary. Her historical mysteries have the sweep of Victorian novels, but she adds contemporary pacing and jolts of suspense to the mix. Reading Perry is a bit like reading Thackeray edited by Elmore Leonard. In this, her twenty-first novel starring middle-class policeman Superintendent Thomas Pitt and his upper-class wife, Charlotte, the year is 1892. The Prince of Wales is living to excess; Jack the Ripper is dissecting Whitechapel prostitutes. Superintendent Pitt has been demoted for testifying against a member of the Inner Circle accused (and convicted) of the seemingly senseless murder of a close friend. Pitt's reassignment, from the Bow Street police station to filthy, disreputable Spitalfields, where he must work as an undercover investigator of possible anarchist plots against the Crown, means total separation from his family. While Pitt wrestles with despair over his tattered reputation and abhorrent living conditions, the ever-capable Charlotte uses her social connections to uncover the motive for the murder that left a prominent antiquarian dead, his friend sentenced to death, and her husband demoted and despairing. Charlotte and Pitt discover, in their separate investigations involving both extremes of London society, a secret that has resulted in grotesque murders and that threatens the government itself. A powerhouse of a history-mystery. (Reviewed October 15, 2000) -- Connie Fletcher
  • Magill Book Review: The Whitechapel Conspiracy is Anne Perry's twenty-first mystery in her Thomas Pitt series, and like its predecessors, it features the paraphernalia, manners, and language of late Victorian England. The plot relies on complications that accrue from the murder of Martin Fetters, an antiquarian, by his friend John Adinett, an adventurer, both of whom support the republican ideals of the revolutions of 1848 in Europe. At first Fetters' death is regarded as a suicide, but Thomas Pitt, a police detective, proves it is murder, and so Adinett is found guilty and hung, without revealing his motive. Adinett had belonged to an Inner Circle of upper class republicans, including Charles Voissey, an appeals court judge furious at not being able to reverse Adinett's verdict. As for Pitt, he is banished by the Inner Circle from his police work in Bow Street to the East End, London's most volatile slum, as an undercover agent for the Special Branch, which fears an uprising in the district. In their attempt to uncover why Adinett killed Fetters, and thereby rescue Pitt from disgrace, Pitt's wife Charlotte, their housemaid Gracie Phipps, and Pitt's former sergeant Samuel Tellman mount their own investigation. While Pitt stays with a Jewish couple, does odd jobs for a silk weaver, and works as a nightwatchman in a sugar factory for his cover, Charlotte and Fetters' wife Juno hunt for Fetters' secret papers, and Tellman and Gracie, following Lyndon Remus, a journalist, about London, discover that the Ripper murders in Whitechapel were done to conceal the dead Duke of Clarence's marriage to a woman named Annie Crook. What this has to do with the Fetters' case is made clear after Pitt finds James Sissons, the owner of the sugar factory, dead in his office. This too is a murder made to look like a suicide, and the note Pitt also finds at the scene blames the Prince of Wales for bankrupting Sissons. It is soon evident that this is a lie meant to close Sissons' sugar factories, throw many of the local poor out of work, and cause an uprising. Luckily, Charlotte is the niece of Lady Vespacia Cumming-Gould, and in possession of Pitt's evidence, as well as the incriminating papers she and Juno have finally unearthed, she impels her aunt to attempt to foil the conspiracy that threatens to pull down the monarchy and even Parliament. Though it is tedious with too many formal visits and too many surveillance details, the look into late-nineteenth century English society The Whitechapel Conspiracy provides, and the plot threads it lays out and gradually weaves together, make it an absorbing novel. -- Essay by Mark McCloskey.
  • Yet another chapter in the life of Superintendent Thomas Pitt of Victorian London's Bow Street Station (Half Moon Street, p. 87, etc.). The curtain rises on an unlikely beginning: the trial of John Adinett for the murder of his longtime friend Martin Fetters. Though the death first seemed an accident, Pitt's painstaking investigation has proved it to be murder at the hands of Adinett, a killer apparently without motive. Instead of earning Pitt praise, however, Adinett's swift conviction and death sentence bring his nemesis a demotion to the rundown precinct of Spitalfields, where he is to live and work away from his connections and his loving wife Charlotte. Sunk in dejection, Pitt perks up when he hears rumors of a so-called Inner Circle of powerful men who wanted Fetters dead for unspecified nefarious reasons of their own. Reporter Lyndon Remus is attempting to link the killing to Jack the Ripper's labors in Whitechapel a few years back. Meanwhile, Charlotte has become a friend to Fetters's widow Juno. Searching together in the victim's library, they discover Adinett's motive for the murder—and a far-fetched one it is.There'll be more killings before the tumultuous saga comes to an end—not a moment too soon for this overlong, unconvincing bag of bones. (Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2000)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
049566
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Perry, Anne
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Thomas and Charlotte Pitt mysteries
Series volume
0021
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Pitt, Charlotte (Fictitious character)
  • Pitt, Thomas (Fictitious character)
  • Women detectives
  • Police
  • London (England)
  • Police spouses
Label
The Whitechapel conspiracy, Anne Perry
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
341 p.
Isbn
9780345433282
Lccn
00064206
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780345433282
  • (OCoLC)44905130
Label
The Whitechapel conspiracy, Anne Perry
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
341 p.
Isbn
9780345433282
Lccn
00064206
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780345433282
  • (OCoLC)44905130

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