Coverart for item
The Resource Sons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler, Bruce Henderson

Sons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler, Bruce Henderson

Label
Sons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler
Title
Sons and soldiers
Title remainder
the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler
Statement of responsibility
Bruce Henderson
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
As Jewish families were trying desperately to get out of Europe during the menacing rise of Hitler's Nazi party, some chose to send their young sons away to uncertain futures in America, perhaps never to see them again. As these boys became young men, they were determined to join the fight in Europe. In 1942, the U.S. Army unleashed one of its greatest secret weapons in the battle to defeat Adolf Hitler: training nearly 2,000 of these German-born Jews in special interrogation techniques and making use of their mastery of the German language, history, and customs. Known as the Ritchie Boys after the Maryland camp where they were trained, they were sent in small, elite teams to join every major combat unit in Europe, where they interrogated German POWs and gathered crucial intelligence that saved American lives and helped win the war. Though they knew what the Nazis would do to them if they were captured, the Ritchie Boys eagerly joined the fight to defeat Hitler. As they did, many of them did not know the fates of their own families left behind in occupied Europe. Taking part in every major campaign in Europe, they collected key tactical intelligence on enemy strength, troop and armored movements, and defensive positions. A postwar Army report found that more than sixty percent of the credible intelligence gathered in Europe came from the Ritchie Boys. Bruce Henderson draws on personal interviews with many surviving veterans and extensive archival research to bring this chapter of the Second World War to light
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • Military historian Henderson (Rescue at Los Baños) shares the story of eight of the 1,985 young German and Austrian Jewish men who escaped the Nazis, emigrated to America, joined the U.S. Army, and returned to Europe to interrogate German POWs, largely during the last year of WWII. Called the Ritchie Boys after the military camp where they underwent eight weeks of intensive training, this group of young men proved highly effective in their work because of their accent-free German and knowledge of the nuances of German culture. Yet their activities were also risky because they were Jewish. For example, in December 1944 two Ritchie Boys, Kurt Jacobs and Murray Zappler, were captured in the Ardennes while fighting alongside other American soldiers and were separated from their comrades and shot. Henderson does well to humanize the story of the boys, although he occasionally gets bogged down in the details of particular battles. He also opens the book by overstating the number of victims of the November 1938 German national pogrom known as Kristallnacht. Despite these shortcomings, this is an ably researched and written account of a previously unknown facet of the American-Jewish dimension of WWII. Agent: Writers House. (July) --Staff (Reviewed 05/01/2017) (Publishers Weekly, vol 264, issue 18, p)
  • Discriminatory laws and increasing violence forced many Jews to flee Nazi Germany in the 1930s. Families made heart-wrenching decisions to split up, knowing they might never see one another again. Henderson (And the Sea Will Tell) tells the untold story of the sons of these families who joined the U.S. Army after the outbreak of World War II. Recruited for their knowledge of German language, culture, and psychology, these Camp Ritchie boys, as they came to be known in their training center in western Maryland, endured intense instruction in order to gather intelligence. They fought in every major battle from D-Day until the defeat of Germany in 1945. According to an army estimate, 60 percent of all credible intelligence during World War II resulted from work done by the Camp Ritchie boys. VERDICT An inspiring story about a group of men who took up arms for their adopted country against their former countrymen. Fans of Stephen Ambrose and World War II histories will enjoy this look into a little-known aspect of U.S. Army operations. [See Prepub Alert, 2/6/17.]—Chad E. Statler, Lakeland Community Coll., Kirtland, OH --Chad E. Statler (Reviewed 06/01/2017) (Library Journal, vol 142, issue 10, p119)
  • /* Starred Review */ The inspiring story of the "Ritchie Boys" and their unique contribution to the Allied victory in World War II.The Ritchie Boys, named for Maryland's Camp Ritchie, where they trained, were primarily Jewish refugees from Hitler's Germany, chosen for their language skills and knowledge of German culture. In a highly readable, often thrilling narrative, prolific nonfiction author Henderson (Rescue at Los Baños: The Most Daring Prison Camp Raid of World War II, 2015) focuses on the members of this elite, 2,000-man unit who escaped from Europe and by one means or another made it to the United States. Enlisting for military service, they were given specially designed intelligence training at Camp Ritchie. After their training, they went back to Europe as intelligence specialists and interrogators and performed a vital function on the front lines for the 82nd Airborne and Patton's 3rd Army, among many others. Trained specifically in the details of the Nazi military's order of battle, the Ritchie Boys had the skills to provide Allied forces with detailed knowledge of what they would encounter as they moved forward in the advance across Europe. While Henderson acknowledges the contributions of all the Ritchie Boys his researcher could identify, his account focuses on about a dozen men. He tells the individual stories of how these youngsters' families were split up, especially after Kristallnacht in 1938, and they came here to make a new start, some with just a few dollars in their pockets. Some of the standouts from this impressive group were Werner Angress, who, without proper parachute training, jumped into Normandy with the 82nd Airborne on D-Day; and Victor Brombert, who provided intelligence for the counterattack in the Battle of the Bulge. Others were among the first into some of the most notorious death camps in Germany, and many went on to make equally significant postwar contributions to their adopted country. A gripping addition to the literature of the period and an overdue tribute to these unique Americans.(Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2017)
Biography type
contains biographical information
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10569311
Cataloging source
YDX
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1946-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Henderson, Bruce B.
Dewey number
940.531/503924
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • portraits
Index
index present
Language note
English
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • World War (1939-1945)
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • Jewish soldiers
  • Jews, German
  • World War II
  • HISTORY
  • HISTORY
  • HISTORY
  • Jewish soldiers
  • Jews, German
  • Military intelligence
  • Military participation
  • United States
  • World War, 1939-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler
Label
Sons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler, Bruce Henderson
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Note
Portraits on lining papers
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 411-418) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Prologue: Germany 1938 -- Saving the children -- Escaping the Nazis -- A place to call home -- Camp Ritchie -- Going back -- Normandy -- The breakout -- Holland -- The forests -- Return to Deutschland -- The camps -- Denazification -- Going home
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xii, 429 pages
Isbn
9780062419101
Lccn
2017446169
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits
System control number
(OCoLC)960709002
Label
Sons and soldiers : the untold story of the Jews who escaped the Nazis and returned with the U.S. Army to fight Hitler, Bruce Henderson
Publication
Copyright
Note
Portraits on lining papers
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 411-418) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
  • text
  • still image
Content type code
  • txt
  • sti
Content type MARC source
  • rdacontent
  • rdacontent
Contents
Prologue: Germany 1938 -- Saving the children -- Escaping the Nazis -- A place to call home -- Camp Ritchie -- Going back -- Normandy -- The breakout -- Holland -- The forests -- Return to Deutschland -- The camps -- Denazification -- Going home
Dimensions
24 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
xii, 429 pages
Isbn
9780062419101
Lccn
2017446169
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations, portraits
System control number
(OCoLC)960709002

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      85 Literary Lane, Newnan, GA, 30265, US
      33.38561 -84.669793

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...