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The Resource Rooftop, by Paul Volponi

Rooftop, by Paul Volponi

Label
Rooftop
Title
Rooftop
Statement of responsibility
by Paul Volponi
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Still reeling from seeing police shoot his unarmed cousin to death on the roof of a New York City housing project, seventeen-year-old Clay is dragged into the whirlwind of political manipulation that follows
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • YALSA Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers, 2007
  • YALSA Best Books for Young Adults, 2007
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Gr. 8-11. After Clay makes some poor choices, his parents enroll him in a drug program and day school for teens, and now he is clean and studying for the GED. Then his first cousin, Addison, is admitted to the same program, where the childhood buddies reconnect. Drug-dealer Addison may have been into shit on the streets, but Clay finds much to admire in his cousin, who is confident, funny, and caring. Their reunion is cut short when Addison is killed by a cop on a project rooftop, with Clay as a witness. Here Volponis intimate, detailed story of the challenges facing poor, urban youth swells to encompass broader racial and political realities: Addison was a black teen killed by a white officer, and the ensuing investigation becomes a focus for activists protesting the arguably corrupt justice system. Under pressure, Clay lies about Addisons role in the shooting. He cannot undo the lie, but he begins to seek redemption in smaller ways. Despite some overdone symbolism, this thoughtfully crafted, deceptively simple story knits together a high-interest plot, a readable narrative crackling with street slang, and complex personal and societal issues that will engage teen readers. -- Holly Koelling (Reviewed 04-15-2006) (Booklist, vol 102, number 16, p46)
  • Gr 9 Up –Clay, 17, a pot abuser, and his cousin Addison, 18, a crack dealer, both attend Daytop, a day-treatment program in New York City. At one time close, then separated by a family feud, the teens are now working through their problems together. Their parents have just begun to put their dispute behind them when Clay sees Addison shot by the police on the rooftop of the projects where he lived and the incident becomes the focal point of a campaign for racial justice. The pace of the story slows a little just before the shooting, but quickly picks up as the community rallies around the perceived injustice. Delving into the psychological trauma of Clay and the comparison of how he and Addison’s younger brother deal with the killing, the author gives readers a realistic look at individuals, family dynamics, and moral dilemmas. The raw language is in keeping with the story’s events. Parallels can be drawn between this fast-paced novel and Walter Dean Myers’s Monster (HarperCollins, 1999), and a classroom unit could easily be developed about the treatment of minorities within the U.S. justice system. The many facets of life in the projects are revealed through excellent character development, which enables this novel to shine.–Dylan Thomarie, Johnstown High School, NY --Dylan Thomarie (Reviewed August 1, 2006) (School Library Journal, vol 52, issue 8, p131)
  • Clay arrives at his special drug treatment center/high school one morning to discover his estranged cousin Addison has joined the program. Since their mothers' rift, the boys have spent no time together, and Clay's cautious renewal of their friendship gradually builds with the knowledge that Addison has no intention of dropping his dealing, much less his addictions. Teachers, students and the families seem fairly ordinary until tragedy strikes, with Clay becoming a pawn in the politics and grief of those around him. Trying to save Darrell, Addison's younger brother becomes the impetus for Clay to face his own bogeymen the same way he takes on the menacing neighborhood dog that has been terrifying him almost daily. Less cynical than Volponi's first novel, Black and White (2005), this is still discussable for its handling of moral choices and the evasion of responsibility by our society's need to reduce everything to fit our preconceptions. The symbolism is a little too obvious and the characters somewhat stock, but this second work follows closely in the steps of the first. (Fiction. YA) (Kirkus Reviews, June 1, 2006)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
146112
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Volponi, Paul
Dewey number
[Fic]
LC call number
PZ7.V8877
LC item number
Roo 2006
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 9
  • 12
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Death
  • Race relations
  • African Americans
  • Drug abuse
  • Rehabilitation
  • Family life
  • New York (N.Y.)
Target audience
adolescent
Label
Rooftop, by Paul Volponi
Instantiates
Publication
Extent
199 p.
Isbn
9780670060696
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2005022811
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780670060696
  • (OCoLC)61309236
Label
Rooftop, by Paul Volponi
Publication
Extent
199 p.
Isbn
9780670060696
Isbn Type
(hardcover)
Lccn
2005022811
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780670060696
  • (OCoLC)61309236

Library Locations

    • Senoia BranchBorrow it
      148 Pylant Street, Senoia, GA, 30276, US
      33.297709 -84.561283

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