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The Resource Paper things, Jennifer Richard Jacobson

Paper things, Jennifer Richard Jacobson

Label
Paper things
Title
Paper things
Statement of responsibility
Jennifer Richard Jacobson
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
When Ari's mother died four years ago, she had two final wishes: that Ari and her older brother, Gage, would stay together always, and that Ari would go to Carter, the middle school for gifted students. So when nineteen-year-old Gage decides he can no longer live with their bossy guardian, Janna, Ari knows she has to go with him. But it's been two months, and Gage still hasn't found them an apartment. He and Ari have been "couch surfing," staying with Gage's friend in a tiny apartment, crashing with Gage's girlfriend and two roommates, and if necessary, sneaking into a juvenile shelter to escape the cold Maine nights. But all of this jumping around makes it hard for Ari to keep up with her schoolwork, never mind her friendships, and getting into Carter starts to seem impossible. Will Ari be forced to break one of her promises to Mama?
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
Lupine Award (Maine) for Juvenile/Young Adult, 2015.
Review
  • Grades 4-8 There are few things in fifth-grader Arianna’s life that matter: her 19-year-old brother Gage, getting accepted into Carter Middle School, and her precious box of paper things cut out of out mail-order catalogs. Ari’s father was killed in Afghanistan, and when their mother died four years ago, Ari and Gage understood that she wanted them to always stay together. Janna, their strict guardian and parents’ close friend, agrees to let the siblings move out because they have an apartment to rent. In fact, they’re homeless, moving from couch to storage unit to shelter for a six-week period. During that time, Ari holds on to her mother’s dying wish that she follow in the Hazard family tradition of attending Carter. Through Ari’s resiliency, Jacobson introduces readers to the precarious and frightening life of a homeless elementary-school student who holds fast to her dreams and the only family she knows. It is her mature sense of her own needs that informs the adults who love her and helps them to understand how they might build a future together. -- Bush, Gail (Reviewed 02-15-2015) (Booklist, vol 111, number 12)
  • /* Starred Review */ Gr 4 – 8 — This gentle depiction of homelessness follows Arianna Hazard, a fifth grader who bounces between friends' couches and a shelter while struggling to hide her situation from classmates. Ari and her beloved 18-year-old brother Gage live with Jana, a caring but strict foster parent, until Gage decides they should strike out on their own. He plans to find them an apartment; when that doesn't work out, Ari and Gage spend months staying with Gage's girlfriend or buddies, or sneaking into a juvenile shelter on nights when couch surfing isn't an option. Ari has many of the same concerns as her other fifth grade classmates—getting a leadership role at her school, finishing her homework on time, maintaining her friendships—but her living situation makes everything more difficult. Ari's friendships are strained, and her grades slip as she tries to navigate homelessness. Everything becomes challenging, from personal hygiene to getting to school on time. Since her mother's death four years ago (her soldier father was killed before Ari was born), Ari has hoped to fulfill her mother's dream and go to Carter Middle School, a school for gifted students. However, the dip in her grades—and a detention for trying to revive elementary school traditions against the principal's wishes—may ruin her chances. Ari finds comfort in a "family" cut out from catalogs, her "paper things." This novel will engender empathy and understanding of a serious and all-too-real problem. Jacobson's story is poignant but never preachy. While the ending won't come as a surprise to many readers, this is a sweet and touching portrayal of a resilient young girl.—Miranda Doyle, Lake Oswego School District, OR --Miranda Doyle (Reviewed January 1, 2015) (School Library Journal, vol 61, issue 1, p95)
  • Ari and her older brother, Gage, have lived with a strict guardian since their mother died four years ago, but now Gage, 19, wants to leave—and take 11-year-old Ari with him. The siblings’ mother implored them to “Stay together always,” but without an apartment or a job for Gage, they bounce around among friends’ places and a homeless shelter, even spending a night in Gage’s girlfriend’s car. As Ari falls behind at school, she wonders if she can still fulfill her mother’s wish for her to attend a middle-school for gifted kids. Despite an overly neat conclusion, Jacobson (Small as an Elephant ) elevates her book beyond “problem novel” territory with an engaging narrator who works hard to be loyal to her brother—and to her mother’s memory. Small moments pack big emotional wallops, as when a teacher gives Ari “brand-new, tr é s cool shoes” to replace her “ratty” ones, or when Ari pretends that the people she cuts from magazine are a family, because, “With a big family you’re likely to have someone watching out for you always.” A tender exploration of homelessness. Ages 10–up. (Feb.) --Staff (Reviewed December 22, 2014) (Publishers Weekly, vol 261, issue 53, p)
  • There is no safety net for Ari.Or if there is one, it's full of holes. Her parents are both dead, and a friend of her mother, Janna, has been guardian to Ari and her older brother, Gage, for the past few years. But 19-year-old Gage and Janna have never gotten along well. Gage lies to Janna about having a place of his own and moves out with 11-year-old Ari. As she struggles to keep up with her classes—her hopes of attending a school for the gifted next year rest on this unlikely feat—they move from place to place: friends' and acquaintances' homes, homeless shelters and even a car. Ari's plight vividly illustrates the myriad consequences of homelessness, and the adults around her who should be picking up on the numerous clues to her situation seem oblivious. Her perceptive first-person voice neatly captures her conflicted loyalty to Gage but also to Janna, as well as her valiant attempts to make an impossible situation work out. Small acts of kindness help the pair get by. It's Ari's poignantly depicted play with her "Paper Things," a treasured pseudo-family of cut-out magazine people, that conveys most effectively her loss and hope. If the resolution is too easy, it is also satisfying, the journey enlightening. A thoughtful and moving exploration of homelessness. (Fiction. 10-14)(Kirkus Reviews, December 1, 2014)
Awards note
  • CCBC Choices, 2016
  • Charlotte Huck Honorable Mention, 2016
  • Rebecca Caudill Young Readers' Book Award, 2019.
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10396655
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1958-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Jacobson, Jennifer
Dewey number
[Fic]
Index
no index present
Intended audience
Ages 9-12
Interest level
MG
LC call number
PZ7.J1529
LC item number
Pap 2015
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/minGradeLevel
  • 4
  • 8
Reading level
5.4
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Study program name
Accelerated Reader AR
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Orphans
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Gifted girls
  • Promises
  • Homeless children
  • Maine
  • Orphans
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Gifted girls
  • Promises
  • Homeless children
  • Brothers and sisters
  • Gifted girls
  • Orphans
  • Promises
  • Maine
  • Siblings
  • Gifted children
  • Orphans
  • Promises
Target audience
juvenile
Label
Paper things, Jennifer Richard Jacobson
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
376 pages
Isbn
9780763694418
Lccn
2014944677
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)884480005
Label
Paper things, Jennifer Richard Jacobson
Publication
Copyright
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Dimensions
20 cm
Edition
First edition.
Extent
376 pages
Isbn
9780763694418
Lccn
2014944677
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)884480005

Library Locations

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      33.38561 -84.669793

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