Coverart for item
The Resource My sister's keeper : a novel, Jodi Picoult

My sister's keeper : a novel, Jodi Picoult

Label
My sister's keeper : a novel
Title
My sister's keeper
Title remainder
a novel
Statement of responsibility
Jodi Picoult
Title variation
My sisters keeper
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Storyline
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
  • Abraham Lincoln Illinois High School Book Award, 2006.
  • Alex Award, 2005.
  • Black-Eyed Susan Book Award (Maryland), High School, 2007.
  • Booklist Editors' Choice: Adult Books for Young Adults, 2004.
  • Heartland Award, 2006.
  • Pennsylvania Young Reader's Choice Awards, Young Adult, 2007.
  • Virginia Readers' Choice Award for High School, 2007.
  • School Library Journal Best Books: Best Adult Books 4 Teens, 2005.
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Expect to be kept up all night by Picoult’s latest novel, but it’s much more than a page-turner; it’s a fascinating character study framed by a complex, gripping story. Thirteen-year-old Anna Fitzgerald walks into the office of lawyer Campbell Alexander and announces she wants to sue her parents for the rights to her own body. Anna was conceived after her older sister, Kate, developed a rare form of leukemia at the age of two, and has donated bone marrow and blood to her sister. Now she has been asked to donate a kidney, and she intends to refuse. Campbell is a jaded young man who nevertheless decides to take her case pro bono. Anna’s parents are shocked when they learn of her lawsuit, and her mother, a former civil defense attorney, decides to represent them. Anna refuses to budge on her position despite the fact that she clearly loves her sister and longs for her family’s happiness. As the gripping court case builds, the story takes a shocking turn. Told in alternating perspectives by the engaging, fascinating cast of characters, Picoult’s novel grabs the reader from the first page and never lets go. This is a beautiful, heartbreaking, controversial, and honest book. -- Kristine Huntley (BookList, 01-01-2004, p790)
  • Adult/High School –Anna was genetically engineered to be a perfect match for her cancer-ridden older sister. Since birth, the 13-year-old has donated platelets, blood, her umbilical cord, and bone marrow as part of her family's struggle to lengthen Kate's life. Anna is now being considered as a kidney donor in a last-ditch attempt to save her 16-year-old sister. As this compelling story opens, Anna has hired a lawyer to represent her in a medical emancipation suit to allow her to have control over her own body. Picoult skillfully relates the ensuing drama from the points of view of the parents; Anna; Cambell, the self-absorbed lawyer; Julia, the court-appointed guardian ad litem; and Jesse, the troubled oldest child in the family. Everyone's quandary is explicated and each of the characters is fully developed. There seems to be no easy answer, and readers are likely to be sympathetic to all sides of the case. This is a real page-turner and frighteningly thought-provoking. The story shows evidence of thorough research and the unexpected twist at the end will surprise almost everyone. The novel does not answer many questions, but it sure raises some and will have teens thinking about possible answers long after they have finished the book.–Susan H. Woodcock, Fairfax County Public Library, Chantilly, VA --Susan H. Woodcock (Reviewed January 1, 2005) (School Library Journal, vol 51, issue 1, p159)
  • The difficult choices a family must make when a child is diagnosed with a serious disease are explored with pathos and understanding in this 11th novel by Picoult (Second Glance , etc.). The author, who has taken on such controversial subjects as euthanasia (Mercy ), teen suicide (The Pact ) and sterilization laws (Second Glance ), turns her gaze on genetic planning, the prospect of creating babies for health purposes and the ethical and moral fallout that results. Kate Fitzgerald has a rare form of leukemia. Her sister, Anna, was conceived to provide a donor match for procedures that become increasingly invasive. At 13, Anna hires a lawyer so that she can sue her parents for the right to make her own decisions about how her body is used when a kidney transplant is planned. Meanwhile, Jesse, the neglected oldest child of the family, is out setting fires, which his firefighter father, Brian, inevitably puts out. Picoult uses multiple viewpoints to reveal each character's intentions and observations, but she doesn't manage her transitions as gracefully as usual; a series of flashbacks are abrupt. Nor is Sara, the children's mother, as well developed and three-dimensional as previous Picoult protagonists. Her devotion to Kate is understandable, but her complete lack of sympathy for Anna's predicament until the trial does not ring true, nor can we buy that Sara would dust off her law degree and represent herself in such a complicated case. Nevertheless, Picoult ably explores a complex subject with bravado and clarity, and comes up with a heart-wrenching, unexpected plot twist at the book's conclusion. (Apr.) --Staff (Reviewed February 16, 2004) (Publishers Weekly, vol 251, issue 7, p148)
  • Imagine that you were conceived to be the donor of bone marrow and platelets for your older sister, who has a rare form of cancer. Imagine what it would be like to grow up in a family where everyone is constantly aware of one child's deadly illness, so that all decisions must be filtered through what will work for her treatment or her most recent medical emergency. How can a 12-year-old decide against donating a kidney to her older sister? By having this story narrated by each character in turn, Picoult (Second Glance ) shows readers the dilemmas facing everyone involved: from Anna, the child who sues her parents for medical emancipation; to Sara, the mother who loves all three of her children but must devote continual attention to the daughter with cancer; and to Jesse, the son who has abandoned hope of ever being noticed by his parents. Picoult's timely and compelling novel will appeal to anyone who has thought about the morality of medical decision making and any parent who must balance the needs of different children. Highly recommended.—Kim Uden Rutter, Lake Villa Dist. Lib., IL --Kim Uden Rutter (Reviewed March 15, 2004) (Library Journal, vol 129, issue 5, p108)
  • Picoult's latest chronicle of family travail (Second Glance, 2003, etc.) highlights the consequences of deliberately conceiving a child genetically compatible with a mortally ill sibling.The author vividly evokes the physical and psychic toll a desperately sick child imposes on a family, even a close and loving one like the Fitzgeralds. Picoult's plotting, though, is less sure, as an inherently somber tale morphs into a melodrama with a too-neat twist. Anna Fitzgerald, the 13-year-old who begins the story, was conceived in vitro, and her embryo's genetic makeup closely matched that of her sister Kate. Now 16, Kate was diagnosed at 2 with acute promyelocytic leukemia. In the years that followed she has suffered numerous relapses, despite the infusion of Anna's platelets and bone marrow, even stem cells from her sister's umbilical cord. Their parents, Sara and Brian, now want Anna to give Kate one of her kidneys; compromised by her drastic treatments, Kate's organs are shutting down. Instead, Anna contacts attorney Campbell Alexander and asks him to represent her; she wants her parents to stop using her body to help Kate. Like elder brother Jesse, who's turned his angst into arson and general bad-boy behavior, she has spent her life in the shadow of her sister's illness—one year Kate had to be hospitalized on every holiday. Sara, who has made keeping Kate alive her life's mission, is very angry, but Brian initially takes Anna's side, feeling too much has been asked of her. A hearing is scheduled, though Anna is torn between her affection for Kate and what she feels must be done. As the hearing begins Kate is hospitalized, Jesse's arson is discovered, and Anna initially refuses to testify. There can be no easy outcomes in a tale about individual autonomy clashing with a sibling's right to life, but Picoult thwarts our expectations in unexpected ways.Despite overplotting, then, a telling portrait of a profoundly stressed family. (Kirkus Reviews, January 15, 2004)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
122079
Cataloging source
LKR
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Picoult, Jodi
Dewey number
813/.54
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS3566.I372
LC item number
M9 2004
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Sisters
  • Teenage girls
  • Leukemia
  • Organ donors
  • Sick children
  • Mothers and daughters
Label
My sister's keeper : a novel, Jodi Picoult
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Also available in book club edition: 423 p. ; 22 cm
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st Atria Books hardcover ed.
Extent
vii, 423 p.
Isbn
9780743454520
Isbn Type
(hc.)
Lccn
2004300043
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780743454520
  • (OCoLC)54811160
Label
My sister's keeper : a novel, Jodi Picoult
Publication
Note
Also available in book club edition: 423 p. ; 22 cm
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st Atria Books hardcover ed.
Extent
vii, 423 p.
Isbn
9780743454520
Isbn Type
(hc.)
Lccn
2004300043
System control number
  • (Sirsi) i9780743454520
  • (OCoLC)54811160

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      85 Literary Lane, Newnan, GA, 30265, US
      33.38561 -84.669793
    • A. Mitchell Powell Jr. BranchBorrow it
      25 Hospital Road, Newnan, GA, 30263, US
      33.387732 -84.816797
    • Senoia BranchBorrow it
      148 Pylant Street, Senoia, GA, 30276, US
      33.297709 -84.561283

Library Links

Processing Feedback ...