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The Resource Homesick for another world, Ottessa Moshfegh

Homesick for another world, Ottessa Moshfegh

Label
Homesick for another world
Title
Homesick for another world
Statement of responsibility
Ottessa Moshfegh
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"An electrifying first collection from one of the most exciting short story writers of our time Ottessa Moshfegh's debut novel Eileen was one of the literary events of 2015. Garlanded with critical acclaim, it was named a book of the year byThe Washington Postand theSan Francisco Chronicle, nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, short-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and won the PEN/Hemingway Award for debut fiction. But as many critics noted, Moshfegh is particularly held in awe for her short stories. Homesick for Another World is the rare case where an author's short story collection is if anything more anticipated than her novel. And for good reason. There's something eerily unsettling about Ottessa Moshfegh's stories, something almost dangerous, while also being delightful, and even laugh-out-loud funny. Her characters are all unsteady on their feet in one way or another; they all yearn for connection and betterment, though each in very different ways, but they are often tripped up by their own baser impulses and existential insecurities. Homesick for Another Worldis a master class in the varieties of self-deception across the gamut of individuals representing the human condition. But part of the unique quality of her voice, the echt Moshfeghian experience, is the way the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and compassion. Moshfegh is our Flannery O'Connor, and Homesick for Another Worldis her Everything That Rises Must Convergeor A Good Man is Hard to Find. The flesh is weak; the timber is crooked; people are cruel to each other, and stupid, and hurtful. But beauty comes from strange sources. And the dark energy surging through these stories is powerfully invigorating. We're in the hands of an author with a big mind, a big heart, blazing chops, and a political acuity that is needle-sharp. The needle hits the vein before we even feel the prick"--
Storyline
Tone
Writing style
Character
Award
New York Times Notable Book, 2017
Review
  • /* Starred Review */ Man Booker Prize finalist for Eileen (2015), Moshfegh now presents a collection of short stories exploring aspects of the human experience from which we usually avert our eyes, lives which we would rather not acknowledge. A barely functioning alcoholic teacher at an NYC Catholic school, a pimple-pinching violinist in a locked room, an old man trying to manipulate his young female neighbor, and a girl convinced that killing another person will take her to the better world she came from—these are among the evocatively drawn characters Moshfegh animates to provide glimpses of our collective human psyche. Success, failure, belonging, isolation, connections, and nostalgia all are recalibrated in the ways these individuals live and think and feel. Plot twists are almost irrelevant in Moshfegh’s unhesitating illumination of dark places. She is fearless in her probing of her characters’ emotional wounds, proceeding with such a sure touch that readers are compelled, not repelled. The directness of her style demands that we register the life “stuffed between the mattress and the wall.” While it is not always an easy read, this collection will leave readers with a sharper, more compassionate sense of the human condition. -- Viswanathan, Shoba (Reviewed 10/15/2016) (Booklist, vol 113, number 4, p16)
  • /* Starred Review */ In 14 expertly crafted stories, Moshfegh (Eileen) examines characters and situations too weird to be real and too real to be fiction, with themes of alienation, ennui, displacement, sexual neuroses, and addiction. A voyeuristic old man steels his courage to approach the beautiful, aloof woman working at the counter of the local arcade (“Mr. Wu”); an aspiring actor hooked on motivational clichés spins out of control in a breakup saga (“The Weirdos”); a high school English teacher has an on-again/off-again relationship with the drug-dealing “zombies at the bus depot” (“Slumming”); a grieving husband uncovers evidence of his dead wife’s infidelity and explores his own sexuality (“The Beach Boy”); an underachieving suitor embarks on a desperate quest for a cheap ottoman that holds the key to his quixotic romantic endeavors (“Dancing in the Moonlight”). There’s not a throw-away story in the collection. Each resonates with seemingly effortless, ineffable prose, rarely striking an inauthentic note—particularly memorable are the endings, which often land to devastating effect. The author’s acute insight focuses obsessively, uncomfortably, humorously on excreta, effluvia, and human foible, drilling to the core of her characters’ existential dilemmas. Moshfegh is a force. (Jan.) --Staff (Reviewed 09/05/2016) (Publishers Weekly, vol 263, issue 36, p)
  • /* Starred Review */ Dysfunctional relationships of many stripes—crumbling marriages, bad dates, slacker partners—drive this dark and quirky clutch of stories.Moshfegh’s most remarkable talent early in her career is to turn distasteful domestic situations into magnetic storytelling: her superb debut novel, Eileen (2015), is a Highsmith-ian tale of alcoholism, abuse, and unrequited love, and though the 14 stories in this collection don’t let much more sunlight in, their concision and gallows humor do give them a lift. In “The Beach Boy,” a longtime married couple returns from a vacation, and when the wife suddenly dies, her undeveloped vacation photos force the husband to reassess his understanding of her (did she really hook up with a prostitute?) and himself. In “A Dark and Winding Road,” a well-off man runs into his reprobate brother’s meth-smoking girlfriend, a meeting that proves (in quintessentially Moshfegh-ian phrasing) “disgusting—just as I’d always hoped it to be.” Youngsters are no more or less foolish, like the aspiring actor in “Nothing Ever Happens Here” who falls for his aging landlord, the broke Brooklyn hipster in “Dancing in the Moonlight” who schemes to seduce a high-end furniture designer, or the narrator of “The Weirdos” who can’t quite extract herself from her boorish boyfriend. For all these foibles, though, Moshfegh never approaches her characters from a position of cruelty, with an intention to mock them; they are for the most part ordinary people undone by their desires, just in more peculiar and Day-Glo fashion than everyday life. Moshfegh's prose is usually plainly realist, but “Mr. Wu,” about a man who devises a complex scheme to seduce a woman running a Chinese internet cafe, is a piercing fable of unrequited love. “Life can be strange sometimes, and knowing it can be doesn’t seem to make it any less so,” one character says, and Moshfegh has proven herself more willing than her contemporaries to dive into the muck of that strangeness. A smartly turned and admirably consistent collection about love and its many discontents.(Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2016)
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
10547915
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Moshfegh, Ottessa
Dewey number
813/.6
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS3613.O77936
LC item number
A6 2017
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • American fiction
  • Short stories, American
  • Psychological fiction, American
  • American fiction
  • FICTION
  • FICTION
  • FICTION
  • American fiction
  • Psychological fiction, American
  • Short stories, American
  • Interpersonal relations.
  • Fiction.
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
stories
Label
Homesick for another world, Ottessa Moshfegh
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The beach boy
  • Nothing ever happens here
  • Dancing in the moonlight
  • The surrogate
  • The locked room
  • A better place
  • Bettering myself
  • Mr. Wu
  • Malibu
  • The weirdos
  • A dark and winding road
  • No place for good people
  • Slumming
  • An honest woman
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
294 pages
Isbn
9780399562884
Lccn
2016037523
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)957645681
Label
Homesick for another world, Ottessa Moshfegh
Publication
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The beach boy
  • Nothing ever happens here
  • Dancing in the moonlight
  • The surrogate
  • The locked room
  • A better place
  • Bettering myself
  • Mr. Wu
  • Malibu
  • The weirdos
  • A dark and winding road
  • No place for good people
  • Slumming
  • An honest woman
Dimensions
22 cm
Extent
294 pages
Isbn
9780399562884
Lccn
2016037523
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(OCoLC)957645681

Library Locations

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      33.38561 -84.669793

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