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The Resource Family honor, Robert B. Parker

Family honor, Robert B. Parker

Label
Family honor
Title
Family honor
Statement of responsibility
Robert B. Parker
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
PI Sunny Randall of Boston searches for a rich man's daughter who ran away to be a prostitute. After finding her Sunny must guard her because the girl is on a hit list. She witnessed a conspiracy involving state government
Member of
Pace
Tone
Writing style
Character
Review
  • Parker has ventured into new territory by custom designing a new character for the movies. Boston PI Sunny Randall, Parker's first female sleuth, was created expressly for actress Helen Hunt, who will play petite, blonde Sunny in the film version due out next year. A female in the lead role may sound like a radical departure for Parker, but sadly, once one penetrates the disguises, everything here looks all too familiar. If Sunny were big, beefy, and male, she'd be Spenser; Susan Silverman in the Spenser series has morphed into Julie, a suburban social worker; Rosie, a bull terrier, takes over for Pearl the Wonder Dog; and sidekick Hawk is now played by Spike, a tough-talking gay gourmet. The plot is pretty much a rerun from Parker's earlier books, too. Businessman Brock Patton hires Sunny to track down his missing teenage daughter Millicent. Sunny finds the kid but is reluctant to return her to her family, despite Millicent's bad attitude. Something is bothering the girl, and when two thugs show up at Sunny's loft with guns blazing, it's clear that Millicent is in deep trouble. Parker's quick quips, droll wit, and staccato dialogue are all on display here, so in spite of the tired plot and reworked characters, there's still plenty to enjoy. Besides, Parker remains one of the top sellers in the genre, and if he chooses to dress his hero up in drag, his fans will want to be first in line to admire the emperor's new clothes. ((Reviewed August 1999)) -- Emily Melton
  • -Sunny Randall, Parker's new detective, bears little resemblance to Spenser, his more famous creation. She is petite, attractive, educated, and artistic, whereas he is burly, gruff, and blunt. They do, however, share a penchant for zinging one-liners and shrewd leaps of deduction. Sunny, the ex-wife of the noninvolved son and nephew of the remnants of the Boston Mafia, wants to strike out on her own. The fact that she still loves Richie and hesitates to form new alliances somewhat cramps her style, but does aid her detecting. With an endearing bull terrier named Rosie; a gourmet cook, body-builder sidekick who happens to be gay; and a girlfriend who is a psychiatric social worker, Sunny has as many compatriots as Spenser, and puts them to equally good use. She is hired by wealthy politician Brock Patton to find his runaway daughter. This task is quickly accomplished with the help of Richie's family; what is not so easily discovered is why someone tries to kill Millicent-and Sunny-or why the girl's parents are so reticent and Millicent so fearful. While not much of a mystery, this is an engrossing, quick read and Millicent is a quirky, captivating adolescent. Parker has come up with another winning team.-Susan H. Woodcock, Chantilly Regional Library, VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
  • After 33 novels--including more than two dozen Spenser mysteries--backboned by heros concerned with distinctly male codes of behavior, Parker presents his first female protagonist. She's Sunny Randall, and she's a keeper. In some ways, Sunny is a female Spenser. Like him, she's a former cop, now a Boston PI, quick with a pistol and a quip. She teams with an odd sidekick, Spike, as Spenser teams with Hawk, and she has a significant other, an ex-husband to Spenser's Susan. But Sunny is female, and as she explains in this wonderfully involving and moving novel, that means that she can't rely on the compass of "Be a man" to orient toward life. How to live correctly is this novel's theme, as it is in the best Spenser novels, and to explore that theme Parker borrows situations from those novels. Sunny is hired by a powerful family to find their runaway daughter, Millicent, who, it transpires, is hooking and needs rescuing--like the girl in Taming a Sea-Horse. Once saved from the streets, Sunny trains Millicent in responsible adult ways--cooking, exercise--as Spenser trained Paul in Early Autumn. But it's only a minor knock that Parker uses here elements honed in 30 years of writing, for he uses them with consummate skill. Millicent, it happens, witnessed a conspiracy to murder arising from her cold, ambitious parents--her father aims to be governor--and the Italian mobsters who control them. The mobsters now want her dead, and Sunny, too, if need be. Sunny's fight to save Millicent and herself moves through a wide swath of Boston and its denizens, all etched in Parker's lean and exquisitely cadenced prose. The high suspense is equaled by the emotional power of Sunny's bonding with the damaged girl. A bravura performance, this novel launches what promises to be a series for the ages. BOMC main selection; film rights to Helen Hunt. (Sept.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
  • /* Starred Review */ What if Spenser were a woman? What if he were still by turns macho and sensitive, well-connected in both Boston's law community (because he was an ex-cop) and in Boston's underworld (because the ex-husband she'd walked out on were a mob scion who ran some legitimate saloons started with dirty money), great with weapons and wisecracks, but deep-down sententious and, yes, wise as ever? Chances are he'd be just as potent a fantasy as a woman, but more convincing than when he was a man--and chances are he'd walk and talk just like Sunny Randall, the painter/private eye politically connected banker Brock Patton and his well-groomed wife Betty call when their daughter Millicent, 15, runs away from home. Finding a runaway who must be turning tricks on Boston's streets to survive is no problem, Sunny soon realizes; the problem is figuring out what to do with a runaway who doesn't want to go home, identifying the people she's afraid of, and protecting her from them when every promising lead she gets about how to keep them away from Sunny turns up dead. Fans of Spenser (Hush Money, p. 108, etc.) will be happy to know that Sunny, who doesn't mind fighting back hard, takes her grievances all the way to the top en route to revelations that make her feel "as if I'd spent my life in a convent and was just emerging." Come to think of it, Sunny's also just like Helen Hunt, who'll be playing her in the movie scheduled for shooting next year. Nice, huh? (Kirkus Reviews, July 15, 1999)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
048760
Cataloging source
NDS
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1932-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Parker, Robert B.
Index
no index present
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
Sunny Randall mysteries
Series volume
0001
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Women private investigators
  • Runaway teenagers
  • Randall, Sunny (Fictitious character)
  • Boston (Mass.)
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/titleRemainder
a Sunny Randall novel
Label
Family honor, Robert B. Parker
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
322 p.
Isbn
9780399145667
Lccn
99027488
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o182519014
  • (OCoLC)182519014
Label
Family honor, Robert B. Parker
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Extent
322 p.
Isbn
9780399145667
Lccn
99027488
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o182519014
  • (OCoLC)182519014

Library Locations

    • A. Mitchell Powell Jr. BranchBorrow it
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      33.387732 -84.816797

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