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The Resource A pale horse, Charles Todd

A pale horse, Charles Todd

Label
A pale horse
Title
A pale horse
Statement of responsibility
Charles Todd
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Member of
Tone
Writing style
Review
  • /*Starred Review*/ Fans of psychological whodunits will welcome the arrival of Todd's tenth mystery featuring Scotland Yard inspector Ian Rutledge. A veteran of World War I, Inspector Rutledge is haunted by the spirit of Hamish MacLeod, a Scottish deserter he executed on the French front. (Hamish's voice rings so clearly in Rutledge's ears that the policeman often finds himself responding aloud.) When an unidentified corpse, clad in a gas mask and cloak, is found among the ruins of Fountains Abbey, Rutledge is called in to investigate. Various leads take him to the schoolmaster of a neighboring town and to a group of cottages clustered below the legendary White Horse of Uffington, a nearly 400-foot figure carved into the upper slopes of Uffington Castle. Rutledge questions area constables, suspicious-looking neighbors, and lorry drivers at the local pub, as thoughts of battles past continue to plague his days. (In a memorable scene, a seemingly innocuous game of darts conjures up harrowing images of fellow soldiers long dead.) The mother-and-son team writing as Todd continues to render a refreshingly original historical series that combines Agatha Christie's classical detection with P. D. James' psychological acuity. -- Block, Allison (Reviewed 11-01-2007) (Booklist, vol 104, number 5, p29)
  • Adult/High School –When a body is found in the ruins of an English abbey, Inspector Ian Rutledge and Hamish, the ghost of the man Rutledge executed during the Great War in France, must identify it. Rutledge would prefer to work alone, but Hamish is a persistent voice in his head. Teens with a taste for either mystery or history will enjoy the bantering between the English policeman and his ghostly Scottish tormentor as they work through the puzzle. The English countryside is beautifully drawn, as is the famous Bronze Age White Horse carved into the hills near Uffington, which gives the book its name. The dead man lived at the base of the Horse, and his neighbors have secrets they would prefer to keep. Soon new bodies join the first as the killer may be trying to finish what he started. Suspects abound–until they are murdered. When Rutledge discovers the true identity of the one in the abbey, he realizes that the British War Office may be working against him, and that the man’s own family would prefer that Rutledge just go away. But the inspector is as relentless as the ghost who haunts him, and he will find his answers even if it costs him his career or his life.–Will Marston, Berkeley Public Library, CA --Will Marston (Reviewed April 1, 2008) (School Library Journal, vol 54, issue 4, p174)
  • /* Starred Review */ The exemplary 10th Inspector Ian Rutledge historical whodunit (after A False Mirror ) offers tight plotting and rich characterization amid understated but convincing evocations of post–WWI England. Haunted by memories of battle, unable to find a safe haven after his discharge from a psychiatric hospital and the abrupt departure of his fiancée, shell-shocked veteran Rutledge has returned to his prewar life as a Scotland Yard inspector. This time out, the War Office wants him to locate a mysterious person of interest, connected with (and perhaps the same as) an unidentified corpse found at a Yorkshire abbey. Rutledge toils diligently to uncover personal secrets and shames that may have motivated someone to kill, and their connection to a long-ago romance between the suspected killer's wife and the local inspector investigating the case. The mother and son writing as Charles Todd show no evidence of running out of ideas for murder mysteries that illuminate new aspects of their compelling protagonist and the horrors of the Great War. (Dec.) --Staff (Reviewed October 8, 2007) (Publishers Weekly, vol 254, issue 40, p38)
  • When Scotland Yard Inspector Ian Rutledge is sent to a small village to look for a missing man, he has no idea that the case will become so complicated or that the people encountered will be so secretive. At the same time, an unidentified body is found in the ruins of a Yorkshire abbey, and the detective in charge of the case wants to pin the murder on the man who married his former fiancée. In his ninth outing (after A False Mirror ), Rutledge uses all of his investigative prowess to piece together painstakingly what happened and how the two cases are connected. Award winner Todd, the pseudonym for a mother-and-son writing team, is brilliant at creating atmosphere and unforgettable characters. Fans of historicals by Rennie Airth and Anne Perry will snap this up. For all mystery collections. --Jo Ann Vicarel (Reviewed November 1, 2007) (Library Journal, vol 132, issue 18, p47)
  • World War I may be over, but the tragedies, as always in Todd's work (A False Mirror, 2007, etc.), linger on.At first it seems that the corpse might have fallen victim to cultists who left behind bits of candle wax and a book on alchemy. But Inspector Rutledge, dispatched to the Yorkshire countryside to settle matters, quickly dispels that notion before returning to Scotland Yard. When the War Office sends him back to find a missing scientist, he wonders if it's that forlorn corpse. A local copper with vengeful fantasies of his own insists that no, it's the bloke who scarred his lost love's face and was done in by her husband, the village schoolmaster. Rutledge, with niggling asides from Hamish, the ghost of the soldier he executed for desertion, has another candidate: Gaylord Partridge, who may have taken on the alias to hide from the War Department, his estranged daughters and his obscure guilt. More murder and arson follow. The village is rife with nightmares, the inevitable consequences of unspeakable behavior during the War. Secrets are everywhere and relationships shattered by war undermine nearly everyone, especially the grieving Rutledge, who must determine who's who, who killed whom and why the victims had to die.Another penetrating, emotionally lacerating antiwar fable from a master of the form. If the Washington hawks who cajole us into battle could be induced to read Todd, they might have second thoughts. (Kirkus Reviews, October 15, 2007)
http://library.link/vocab/ext/novelist/bookUI
211247
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Todd, Charles
Dewey number
813/.54
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS3570.O37
LC item number
P35 2008
Literary form
fiction
http://library.link/vocab/resourcePreferred
True
Series statement
An Inspector Ian Rutledge mystery
Series volume
0010
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Rutledge, Ian (Fictitious character)
  • Police
  • Great Britain
Label
A pale horse, Charles Todd
Instantiates
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
360 p.
Isbn
9780061233562
Lccn
2007018088
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o124160975
  • (OCoLC)124160975
Label
A pale horse, Charles Todd
Publication
Dimensions
24 cm.
Edition
1st ed.
Extent
360 p.
Isbn
9780061233562
Lccn
2007018088
System control number
  • (Sirsi) o124160975
  • (OCoLC)124160975

Library Locations

    • Central LibraryBorrow it
      85 Literary Lane, Newnan, GA, 30265, US
      33.38561 -84.669793

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